Thursday, 29 December 2011

December Holidays in the Farm

Though farm animals don’t recognize weekends or public holidays, the December holidays do take on a  go slow. The short rains have subsided but they did a lot of good. Fodder crops are in plenty thus feeding the animals is generally good. The cow that delivered and got sick has recovered fully and also has done good in helping raise two calves which are 3 and 2 months now. The other heifer is still due anytime now.
The newly born Terrier pups

 As for the goats, the older the goat was put down to provide meat for the festivities. The rest are still good and due to delivery in January. On a sad note, a small kid developed some digestion complications and succumbed. Hopefully the next generation will survive to ensure success in the dairy goat project.

The geese are yet to lay. They being slow breeders, take time before they lay and get broody. Also they don’t lay a lot of eggs. They lay between 4 -7 only thus they do need patience before they reach the required economically beneficial population.

It being the coffee season, work on the farm has been reduced to feeding and caring for the animals to picking, sorting and delivering the coffee to the co-operative (This is mainly my mum’s project – the coffee though I assist her from time to time) Also the application of manure was not alone, but will be from January as the work shifts.

Fluffy the mother with her pups
The dogs are still progressing on well despite the loss of the rottie pups.  The female Terrier got 6 puppies and they are splendid. So much so that even people who are not into dogs want some when they see them. In a way, part of my vision is coming to be; breaking people’s rigidity in with regards to their view of dogs which make the best pets, buddies and even offer security. They (puppies) are due to start their jabs which will go on till they are 4 months old. Also the female GSD is also mature now and due to go in season anytime.

The only set back is that the feeds and the medicine are still costly despite changes in favour of the Kenyan Shilling. The stockists always claim that they have to clear old stock acquired when prices were high.

Thursday, 15 December 2011

A video tour of my farm; A 5 part series

This is a 5 part series video of my farm in Karatina Nyeri. You will get to see; The dogs, Goats, Cows, Calves, Geese as well as the foodcrops; Bananas, napier grass, beans, maize and fruit trees.

 I also take you through how I use the manure generated from the cows into the farm.

 Join me as I take you on a tour of  my farm.

  Part 1 - Meet Kamwenji

  Part 2 - The Dairy Cows

Part 3 - Using Organic Manure

 Part 4 - Rearing a Bull and Geese 

 Part 5(The final part)- Meet Elsie

Camera footage and interview by Njeri Wangari
Interruptions during filming by Tornee :-)